MONTHLY EVENTS CALENDAR

MONTHLY EVENTS CALENDAR

During April there are a number of celebration days and here are just a few. We invite you to find those that resonate with you and see how you might focus on these in the classroom.

Easter Wishes 2022

We wish our Christian community a blessed Easter this year. May it be filled with peace and love!

Wishes for Pesach 2022

We wish all celebrating Pesach much joy and many blessings this passover and throughout the year.

Wishes for Ramadan 2022

Welcome the month of Ramadan with a heart filled with peace, harmony and joy.

World Health Day – 7 April

Very often, the younger we are, the more we take our health and vitality for granted, just as we take for granted the fact that our planet is a solid sphere under our feet that will endure us indefinitely.  Given the many changes experienced over the past few years, this can be brought into question.

 

World Health Day on 7 April is a global health awareness day celebrated under the sponsorship of the World Health Organisation (WHO) on the day that it was founded in 1948.

 

The theme for 2022 is Our Planet, Our Health to spotlight global attention on the urgent actions that are necessary to keep humans and the planet healthy. There is also a focus on well-being in societies.  At E3, we invite you to look at the space where you live and the communities within which you spend your time – what can you do to make your world a better place?  

 

For more information, please click here.

International Day of Street Children – 12 April

“The presence of even a single poor child on the street means a million defeats for mankind.” (Mehmet Murat İldan)

 

This day in April provides a voice for children that live on the street as well as an opportunity for human rights organisations to spread awareness for these children throughout the world.

 

There are many reasons children end up on the street. One of the most common reasons is if they live in a country where war and conflict are rampant. Children in this situation are either separated from their family or their family members have died.

Other children leave home voluntarily because they are abused by family members. Some live on the street because they are rejected by their family, have mental health issues, or are being forced into criminal activity. No matter what the case, street children are often denied an education, health care, and other basic human rights.

 

At a convention held by the UN in 1989, it was decided that all children in the world should have the same rights:

  • a stable, loving, and nurturing environment
  • healthcare and nutrition
  • clean water and electric power
  • equal opportunities
  • live in dignity and freedom

 

Street children have none of these rights. That is why this day is so important.

 

To make a difference, please research volunteer organisations that help street children and make an effort to spread their message, help with fundraisers and volunteer where you can.

 

In South Africa, we believe that each child is a national treasure and they should be treated as such.  The reality is that there are many children living on the streets and it is difficult to know exactly how many there are.  

 

For more please click here.

World Malaria Day – 25 April

Did you know that 4.9 million South Africans are at risk of contracting malaria, which, if untreated, can be fatal?  Malaria is a serious and sometimes fatal disease caused by a parasite that infects a certain type of mosquito. You may contract malaria if bitten by an infected mosquito.

 

Malaria is endemic in some areas of South Africa, namely north-eastern KwaZulu-Natal, parts of Mpumalanga and Limpopo. September to May is considered the malaria season.

 

Malaria symptoms may only develop 10-14 days after being bitten by an infected mosquito. Even if you have taken chemoprophylaxis, you can still contract malaria, and then this incubation period might be longer.  This can be quite a problem for people who have travelled to a malaria area and then develop symptoms two weeks later – and then it may present as flu.  

World Malaria Day is an occasion to highlight the need for continued investment and sustained political commitment to malaria prevention and control. It was instituted by World Health Organisation (WHO) member states during the World Health Assembly of 2007.

 

In 2021 a new initiative was launched that aims to halt transmission of the disease in 25 more countries by 2025. Some 11 countries were certified malaria-free and 24 countries reported interrupting malaria transmission for 3 or more years.

 

These figures were only reached by decades of concerted effort.

 

Malaria elimination is a viable goal for all countries. Please read more here.

 

Other children leave home voluntarily because they are abused by family members. Some live on the street because they are rejected by their family, have mental health issues, or are being forced into criminal activity. No matter what the case, street children are often denied an education, health care, and other basic human rights.

27 April Freedom Day

Freedom Day is the commemoration of the first democratic elections held in South Africa on 27 April 1994 in which anyone over the age of 18 could vote, regardless of race.

 

Although we have made remarkable progress since 1994, inequality, poverty and unemployment remain one of the most glaring impediments to South Africa’s goal of national unity and social cohesion.

 

On this day we remember the many sacrifices made by patriots to ensure our democracy and freedom. Our history abounds with selfless patriots who paved the way for a democratic and free South Africa.

1 May International Workers Day

Think about the role of workers in any nation – these are the individuals whose efforts literally build the nation.  For us at E³, this is part of the goal that we are striving towards.  We want all young people in South Africa to emerge from their schooling ready to enter the job market, with a growth mindset that will help them as a worker who will help build the nation, and/or further their education.

 

Following the first democratic elections in South Africa in 1994, the 1st of May was inaugurated as an official national public holiday. In 2022, South Africans will observe this holiday on the 2nd of May.  As you enjoy your public holiday this year, please give some thought to the role of Trade Unions and other labour movements that strive to improve working conditions in our country.  Please also look around at the young people in your life and give some thought to how you might help them prepare for the world of work that awaits them.